Speak English Salon


Leave a comment

Waiting for Superman

There’s a good statistic in the film: while American kids score near the bottom of most international comparative aptitude tests, the area where American kids do excel is confidence.
A study done about ten years ago compared confidence with actual performance and found that the higher students’ confidence in themselves, the worst their performance. I was not surprised.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Japan Times – Phrase 101 ~ ★★

Japan Times の『これで英語が通じた!思ったことがズバリ言えるフレーズ」からふだん、会話でよく使う短い言葉。いざ英語で言うとなると…

今週のフレーズ – 101

Don’t kid yourself!

何言ってんだよ

A: Maybe I’ll get a raise this year.

B: Don’t kid yourself. We’ll be lucky if our salaries don’t go down.

A: ことしは昇給するだろうな。

B: 何言ってんだよ。下がらなきゃラッキーってとこだぜ。

相手の考え方が極端に甘かったり非現実的なときに使う、かなりきつい言葉。

Quit dreaming./Quit fooling yourself./Who are you kidding? なども同じ意味。

今週のフレーズ – 101

This is ridiculous !

くそっ

A: This is ridiculous! I didn’t even get an interview.

B: It’s tough finding work, even with a resume like yours.

A:くそっ! 面接も受けられなかった。

B:あなたほどのキャリアでも就職は狭き門なのね。

自分も巻き込まれている状況に対して怒りを表すときの一般的な表現。だれかの発言や報告について、客観的な立場で言う場合は、That’s ridiculous.(バカげている)と言う。

今週のフレーズ – 100

You’re so mean !

いじわる!

A: You’re so mean! Why didn’t you tell me?

B: Every time I call you you’re out.

A: いじわる! なんで知らせてくれなかったのよ!

B: だっていつ電話したって留守だったんだもの。

感情的で、やや子どもっぽい表現。友人や兄弟どうしの言い争いの中で使われる。自分自身が苦しめられたり、第三者に対して不快な思いをさせている相手にも使うことができる。

今週のフレーズ – 99

Suit yourself.

勝手にしろ

A: I’ve made up my mind. I’m going to study in Spain.

B: Suit yourself. I’ve got nothing to do with it anymore.

A: 私決めたの。スペインに留学するわ。

B: 勝手にしろ。俺はもう知らないからな。

相手の決定に反対だというわけでなく、その決定をバカげていると思うが、もう話題にもしたくない、という場合に使われることが多いフレーズ。

今週のフレーズ – 98

Do it right

ちゃんとやりなさい

A: Look at how you planted these flowers. Do it right.

B: Oh — so you could tell.

A: この花の植え方は何なの。ちゃんとやりなさい。

B: ちぇっ。ばれたか。

同じような表現でよく使われるものに、Do it over again. がある。Look at 〜 は、だれかの間違いや不注意に注意を向けさせるための表現。So you could tell. は、批判が的を射ていることを認める言い方。

今週のフレーズ – 97

Hold your tongue !

だまれ!

A: It’s because you spoil him.

B: Hold your tongue! What do you know?

A: あなたが甘やかすから、いけないんです。

B: だまれ! わかったような口をきくな!

おもに夫や父親が使う、やや古くさく、恩着せがましい言葉。Shut upBe quietと同じ意味。What do you know? は修辞的な疑問文で、別な言い方をすれば、You know nothing.(君は何もわかっていない)となる。


Leave a comment

Dialect – Sneakers ★★

73. What is your *general* term for the rubber-soled shoes worn in gym class, for athletic activities, etc.?
a. sneakers (45.50%)
b. tennis shoes (41.34%)
c. gymshoes (5.55%)
d. sand shoes (0.03%)
e. jumpers (0.01%)
f. shoes (1.93%)
g. running shoes (1.42%)
h. runners (0.17%)
i. trainers (0.23%)
j. I have no general word for this (0.89%)
k. other (2.95%)
(10722 respondents)

All Results

Choice a: sneakers

Choice b: shoes

Choice c: gymshoes

Choice f: tennis shoes

Choice g: running shoes

I grew up on the west coast of the United States, living for the first ten years in the Los Angeles area, and the next ten or so years in Portland, Oregon. My father on the other hand, grew up in the Boston area, so the English I speak has been influenced somewhat by his way of speaking. As a child in California, I remember saying “tennis shoes” and sometimes “tennies”. In Oregon, many people called the shoes “running shoes”. After living in Japan as long as I have, I’ve been using “sneaker” to describe the shoes.

_______________________________________

Speak! English Salon/スピーク英会話サロン

福岡市中央区大名1-12-36

★ためにならない日本語ブログ↓↓↓

http://kotsukotsu.wordpress.com/

http://22311221.at.webry.info/


Leave a comment

Elbow – Mirror Ball ★

I plant the kind of kiss
that wouldn’t wake a baby
on the self-same face
that wouldn’t let me sleep;
and the street is singing with my feet,
and the dawn gives me a shadow I know to be taller.

All down to you, dear.
Everything has changed.

My sorry name
has made it to graffiti.
I was looking for
someone to complete me.

Not anymore, dear;
everything has changed.

When we make the moon our mirror ball
the street’s an empty stage;
the city sirens – violins.
Everything has changed.

So lift off love.
(down to you, dear)
Lift off love.
(down to you, dear)

We took the town to town last night.
We kissed like we invented it!
And now I know what every step is for:
to lead me to your door.

Know that while you sleep,
everything has changed.

We made the moon our mirror ball.
The street’s an empty stage;
the city sirens – violins.
Everything has changed.
Everything has changed.
Everything has changed.

Down to you, dear/So lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear/ lift off love
Down to you, dear…


Leave a comment

The Floating Bridge of Dreams ★★

The Floating Bridge of Dreams was written by Ota Nampo. Born into a samurai family, he expressed his literary talents in satirical forms, such as kyoka and kibyoshi. The focus of this story is Eitai Bridge. Two hundred meters long and six meters wide, it was the biggest bridge in Edo. In 1807, during the Fukagawa Hachiman festival, the bridge collapsed under the weight of sightseers who had flocked from all over Edo. Over 400 people died. They included a woman who went to the festival to spite her unfaithful husband. In the wake of the accident, painful farewells and chance meetings fill the city with drama. In this level-headed account, Nampo looks at the causes and effects of an unprecedented disaster.

和訳: 1808年頃に書かれた「夢の浮橋」。作者は大田南畝(おおた・なんぽう)。武士の家に生まれ、狂歌や黄表紙といった滑稽のジャンルで文芸の才能を発揮した。舞台となった永代橋(えいたいばし)は、隅田川にかかる全長200メートル、幅6メートルの江戸第一の橋。1807年、深川八幡宮の祭礼で、江戸市中から見物客が詰めかけたことが原因で永代橋が落下。400人以上の犠牲者を出した。夫の浮気の腹いせに、祭りに出かけ亡くなってしまった妻。事故が生んだ別れや出会いのドラマが街にあふれた。この未曾有の大参事を、南畝は冷静にみつめ事故の実態と意味を書きとめた。

From NHK’s J-Bungaku