Speak English Salon


Leave a comment

The Oval Office ★★

Renovations to the Oval Office, including a new carpet, drapes, wallpaper and furniture, are seen, Aug. 31, 2010, at the White House in Washington. The famous Resolute Desk remains. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)

The Oval Office before and after Obama’s renovations.

George W. Bush’s Oval Office

US President George W. Bush, center, followed by US Vice President Dick Cheney, walks into the Oval Office of the White House January 26, 2001 in Washington, DC for the swearing in of Secretary of State Colin Powell. (LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)

Bill Clinton’s Oval Office

This Sept. 3, 1993 file photo shows President Clinton’s Oval Office at the White House in Washington. The Scott Group of Grand Rapids, Mich., made President Clinton’s Oval Office Rug, seen here, and President Obama’s new Oval Office rug, as well. (J.Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)

George H.W. Bush’s Oval Office

This Jan. 22, 1990 file photo released by the White House shows President George H.W. Bush’s Oval Office at the White House in Washington. Bush’s redecoration of the Oval Office included a new rug with a gold Presidential Seal, new draperies, a coffee table, and two tall armchairs. Presidents typically put their own touches on the Oval Office early in their terms. (Susan Biddle/White House/AP Photo)

Ronald Reagan’s Oval Office

President Ronald Reagan takes one last fond look back at the Oval Office at the White House January 20, 1989 as he leaves for the Capitol for the inauguration of President George H.W. Bush.(Dirck Halstead/Getty Images)

Richard Nixon’s Oval Office

President Richard Nixon (R) and Vice President Gerald Ford face each other in the Oval Office on the day Nixon resigned, White House, Washington, DC., Aug. 9, 2974. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Lyndon B. Johnson’s Oval Office

President Lyndon Johnson is shown in the Oval office in this 1963 file photo. (Courtesy The White House Historical Association)

John F. Kennedy’s Oval Office

This Feb. 5, 1961 file photo shows a view of the Resolute desk in President Kennedy’s Oval Office at the White House in Washington. Built from the timbers of a British warship, the desk was installed in the Oval Office by John F. Kennedy, and since has been used by Presidents Clinton, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. (Bob Schutz/AP Photo)

Renovations:  …を良好な状態に戻す;…を再び新しくする, 革新[刷新]する;…を修繕[修理]する

renovate old cathedrals  古い大教会堂を修復する.

Swearing in:  〈人を〉宣誓させて任命する, 宣誓就任させる

When will the new president be sworn in?  新大統領はいつ宣誓就任しますか.

Secretary of State: 国務長官. ▼他の諸国の外務大臣に当たる

Redecoration: 改装する

Resigned:

I (副 詞)](公式に)辞任する, (職地位などを)やめる, (会社機関から)辞職する⦅from …⦆;

II as名 詞](特定の役職を)辞任する

resign as ambassador 大使を辞任する

resign from the government  政府から退く

Timbers: 2⦅英国用法⦆(建築用の)材木, 木材;板材(⦅米国用法⦆lumber);柱;C⦅〜s⦆〘海事〙フレーム[肋]材(ろくざい);(梁(はり)柱など)1本の木材


Leave a comment

Inherit the Wind ★★★

Inherit the Wind is a 1960 Hollywood film adaptation of the play of the same name, starring Spencer Tracy (as Drummond) and Fredric March (as Brady), and featuring Gene Kelly (as Hornbeck), Harry Morgan (as the Judge), and so on. Inherit the Wind fictionalizes the 1925 Scopes “Monkey” Trial as a means to discuss McCarthyism.Written to respond to the “threat to intellectual freedom” that the McCarthy era represented, the play is dismissive towards creationism.

adaptation: (…の)改訂;改作物, 翻案物⦅from, of …⦆;(…向きの)脚色⦅for …⦆

a television adaptation of …  …のテレビ化

a successful adaptation from another novel  他の小説からの巧みな翻案.

McCarthyism: マッカーシズム:1950年代前半の米国のヒステリックな反共赤狩り運動.[米国の上院国内治安分科会委員長Joseph R. McCarthy(1908-57)]

dismissive: (思い上がった態度で)(…を)却下する[はねつける]ような⦅of …⦆

He was dismissive of the proposal.  彼はその提案をはねつけた.

creationism: 〘神学〙霊魂創造説

_______________________________________

Speak! English Salon/スピーク英会話サロン

http://web.me.com/josephcamcinnis
福岡市中央区大名1-12-36

★ためにならない日本語ブログ↓↓↓
http://22311221.at.webry.info/


Leave a comment

The Right Word – Heavy ★★★

Trying to move a refrigerator out of a third-floor apartment is difficult because it is cumbersome, which means that it is so heavy and bulky that it becomes unwieldy or awkward to handle. Cartons filled with books, on the other hand, are merely heavy, which implies greater density and compactness than the average load.

A huge oak dining table might be described as massive, which stresses largeness and solidity rather than weight, while something that is ponderous is too large or too massive to move, or to be moved quickly (Ex.: a ponderous printing press).

Most of these terms can be used figuratively as well. Heavy, for example, connotes a pressing down on the mind, spirits, or senses (Ex.heavy with fatigue; a heavy heart), and ponderous implies a dull and labored quality (Ex.: a novel too ponderous to read).

Burdensome, which refers to something that is not only heavy but must be carried or supported, is even more likely to be used in an abstract way to describe something that is difficult but can, with effort, be managed (Ex.: a burdensome task). Both a package and a problem may be described as weighty, meaning actually (as opposed to relatively) heavy; but it is more commonly used to mean very important or momentous (Ex.weighty matters to discuss).